SOC409 – PhD’s Guide to Getting a Non-Academic Job

Abstract

Are you a newly minted or almost PhD graduate? Have academic job prospects been stressing you out? Look no further – we may have the solution for you! The academic job market isn’t looking too hot right now, so here we are with a PhD’s Guide to getting a non-academic job! We draw from our personal experiences of navigating the non-academic job market and give you all the practical deets on what search terms to use, what job sites to scour, how to revamp your CV into a resume that’s not 15 pages long, and much more!! Tune in to see if there’s a non-academic job in your future!

Keywords

Non-Academic Job market, employment, PhD’s Guide

Sources

  1. The depressing reality of the current Sociology academic job market
  2. Why doing a PhD is often a waste of time (The Economist)
  3. The Ph.D.’s Guide to a Nonfaculty Job Search (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
  4. What Can I Do With a Ph.D. in My Discipline Outside Academe? (Inside Higher Ed)
  5. Word searches to use:

Evaluation researcher
Statistician
Evaluation research/analyst
Project manager
Principle investigator
Research and evaluation manager
Social scientist
Social science researcher
UX research
Consumer research
Grant writer

  1. Job sites we like:
  2. Eye tracking study shows recruiters look at resumes for 7 seconds (HR Dive)
  3. PhD transferable skills (University of Michigan)
  4. PhD Transferable Skills (Michigan State University)
  5. 9 Skills PhDs Have That Others Don’t (LinkedIn)
  6. Get your face on a mask
  7. Where to Buy Clear Face Masks With Windows for Lip Reading
  8. Quibi Is Shutting Down Barely Six Months After Going Live

SOC408 – Gentrification Through Food (Guest Edition)

Abstract

The way neighborhoods are transformed as investors, capital, and newcomers arrive cannot be understood without talking about cafes, lattes, food security, avocado toast, and race. Dr. Alison Alkon and Dr. Joshua Sbicca join us this week to discuss how food is both a gentrifying force and gentrified itself. The conversation was initiated by a new edited volume by our guests (and Dr. Yuki Kato who could not make it) titled, A Recipe for Gentrification! Tune in to learn more about how neighborhood foodscapes change, and how these changes warrant sociological analysis. All you food and environmental justice peeps, this one’s for you!

http://thesocialbreakdown.libsyn.com/soc40-gentrification-through-food-guest-episode

Keywords

Food, gentrification, sociology, class, race, neighborhoods, urban, food justice, environmental, community gardens

Sources

SOC407: Deinstitutionalization and Politics (Guest Edition with Jacquie Esser)

Abstract 

The Social Breakdown Team has been busy the last several weeks and we were able to get a guest interview with Hawai’i Deputy Public Defender Jacquie Esser. Esser recently ran for State Prosecutor and continues to be a key player in the struggle to bring fundamental change to the criminal legal system in Hawai’i and throughout the nation. As we head into the final moments of one of the most important presidential elections in recent memory, the stakes could not be higher in understanding the future impacts of deinstitutionalization, police, and criminalization in U.S. society.

Keywords

Politics, deinstutionalization, criminal justice, mass incarceration, police, criminalization

Sources

  1. Follow Jacquie Esser online!
  2. Deinstitutionalization Explained (Brief Overview)
  3. Deinstitutionalization and Jails in Hawaii 
  4. Alternatives to American Jails and Prisons?: North Dakota and the Experiment in Norway
  5. What is LEAD? See what your state is up to…
  6. CAHOOTS the Crisis Assistance Program
  7. Jacquie Esser refers to “OHA” which is the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, a public agency in Hawaii. OHA is responsible for “improving the well-being of Native Hawaiians.”

SOC406 – Pre-election Special: The Politics of Higher Education

Abstract

Over the past three years, those of us in higher education have become more and more aware of the role politics play in academia. And on July 6th 2020, things came to a head when the Department of Homeland Security announced that international students who take only online courses in Fall 2020 were required to transfer schools, find in-person classes to take, or leave the country. Roughly a week later, DHS rescinded the order. So, we have our friend and colleague, Nathalie Rita, with us to discuss the role of politics in the academy, the role of the academy in politics, and the precarity of international students in the United States. Tune in to listen to our special pre-election episode, and please GO VOTE!

Keywords

Higher education, politics, election, international students, immigration

Sources

SOC405 – The Political Spectacle 2: GO VOTE!

Abstract

We’re continuing our trek into the world of politics and spectacles a la Murray Edelman this week in preparation for the upcoming election. We review what Edelman means when he says, “politics is a spectacle,” and how spectacles can lead us to vote against our own interests. Why is it that people targeted by Trump’s policies voted for him in 2016, and may still vote for him in 2020? How do politicians carefully craft (or impulsively create) spectacles that serve their own good? Tune in here to learn more, and be sure to go out and VOTE!

Keywords

Political spectacle, politics, symbols, material politics, symbolic politics, go vote

Sources

SOC404 – Manifesting Masculinities (Guest Edition)

Abstract

We’ve talked about femininity, feminism, and feminist criminology, but we have yet to tackle masculinity! So, we have a fabulous guest, Dr. Dan Cassino, a professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University, with us this episode to explain what hegemonic masculinity is, how there are masculinities (plural!), and how they manifest themselves in our society. Join us for a timely discussion about what it means to be a “man” today, and how masculinity has influenced and continues to influence our politics today.

Keywords

Masculinity, masculinities, gender identity, politics

Sources

SOC403 – Empathy: “It’s more than a feeling”

Abstract

Many people have heard the phrase, “take a walk in my shoes,” but what does this really mean? Is it possible to understand what someone is going through without sharing the same experiences? The answers to these questions may seem obvious, but it’s more complicated than you think! So this week, we’re getting into the nitty-gritty of distinguishing empathy from sympathy, and defining the two. As the world is facing unprecedented times and world leaders are contracting COVID-19, perhaps a little bit of empathy is important… or is it not? Join us for another fun dip in social psychology and emotions!

Keywords

Empathy, sympathy, sociology of emotions, social psychology, COVID-19

Sources

  1. Check out Jamil Zaki and Kevin Ochsner’s chapter on empathy in Barrett et al.’s “Handbook of Emotions”
  2. Our hearts go out to Chrissy Teigen and John Legend over their recent miscarriage.
  3. Experts have pinpointed Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination event as the “super spreader” event that caused many White House officials to contract the virus.
    1. A New York Times article on how Trump is the leading cause of COVID-19 misinformation
  4. Three types of empathy… a short guide
  5. Has Trump learned anything from COVID-19? Absolutely not
  6. Some people do not think the President is being “empathetic”
  7. America Has A Super Spreader President 
  8. A fun article on the etiquette of Zoom.

SOC402 – Intro to Sociology of Education (Guest Edition)

Abstract

This week we sat down with Dr. Mary Kate Blake, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology from Valparaiso University, for a rundown of sociology of education. What is the sociology of education? How is education a structural component of society? Why is it so important to the economy and the labor market? We discuss the impacts of high school counselors, the journey of going to college, and of course, what education is like during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Keywords

Sociology of education, college, labor market, COVID-19

Sources

SOC401 – “You’re all sociologists!” Part 3: Don’t get senioritis!

Abstract

Welcome to senior year! It’s Fall 2020 and we are off to a great start with part 3 of our “You’re all sociologists!” series. For this premiere episode, we catch up on what the gang has been up to after summer vacation and we discuss how to take sociology to the next level. What does being a sociologist mean during this time of social unrest and political turmoil? How can we use the sociological imagination to help us understand the current social issues? Grab your thinking hat and join us for a new semester of advanced sociology!

Keywords: sociology, society, sociological imagination, public sociology

Sources

Breakaway Episode 10 – Inequality at Bon Appétit

Abstract

Penn and Ellen are avid fans of Bon Appetit’s YouTube channel. ‘Gourmet Makes,’ ‘Back to Back Chef,’ ‘It’s Alive with Brad’, and that one where Chris recreates dishes blind-folded– WE LOVE THEM ALL. But at the start of June, it was revealed that there is shocking inequality in Bon Appetit: white chefs appearing in videos were being paid for their time, while chefs of color were not, and leadership was engaging in other racist practices. So, we had to get together for a breakaway and talk about this drama, and how the culinary industry is rife with inequality. Tune in here!

Keywords

Bon Appetit, chefs, cooking, culinary, food, food media, inequality, media, racism, YouTube

Sources