SOC503 – Social Problems and Social Causes: We have an episode on it

Abstract

The gang is back! We tackle a foundational topic in sociology: social problems! Social problems relate to numerous other concepts that we’ve discussed – inequality, stratification, the social construction of reality, and all the “-isms.” Social problems are social in their causes, consequences, and solutions and though, social problems are often discussed at the macro societal level, its symptoms often manifest in everyday micro life. Join us as we talk through some big hit social problems – COVID-19, unemployment, crime and deviance, education, racism, ageism, and more!

Keywords

Social problems, inequality, stratification, theory

Sources

  1. The Social Construction of Reality by Berger and Luckmann (1966)
  2. We have an episode on it!
    1. SOC215 – Social Stratification, Capitalism, and Inequality: All the Sad Things
    2. SOC307 – The Social Construction of Rock n’ Roll
    3. SOC208 – Left Handed Devils: The Social Construction of Deviance
    4. SOC315 – The Political Spectacle: Symbols in Politics
    5. SOC207 – Three Schools of Thought: Conflict Theory, Structural Functionalism, and Symbolic Interactionism
  3. OnlyFans Reverses Its Decision to Ban Explicit Content

SOC314 – Family Demography and Intergenerational Solidarity Theory (Guest Edition)

Abstract

Sociology is obviously concerned about connecting private troubles to public issues, as C. Wright Mills once said. Sociologists are also deeply interested in the relationships between people, and the intimate relationships we have with family members. This week, we have a fantastic guest, Dr. Sarah Patterson, who is helping us make sense of these connections. Sarah will be talking with us about families, family demography, and Intergenerational Solidarity Theory. What makes families work or struggle through their interactions? And do families promote positive social solidarity among all its members? Come join us for the conversation!

Sources

SOC207 – Three Schools of Thought: Conflict Theory, Structural Functionalism, and Symbolic Interactionism

Abstract

This week we go back to the basics by introducing the three schools of sociological thought – conflict theory, structural functionalism, and symbolic interactionism. Knowing these three schools is a must for any aspiring sociologist. Join us as we discuss how Marx theorized the process of social change through conflict, why Durkheim believed society needed religion in order to function, and why people interpret the symbolic significance of guns differently. Which school of thought do you subscribe to?

Keywords

Sociology, theory, social theory, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, structural functionalism

Sources

  1. Definition of social theory 
  2. Understanding Social Problems, 5th ed by Mooney, Knox, and Schacht, 2007.
  3. A fun and short video from Crash Course titled, “Major Sociological Paradigms” that may help better understand the three theories
  4. Conflict – Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto 
  5. Conflict – Arlie Hochschild’s The Managed Heart
  6. Structural Functionalism – Talcott Parson’s The Social System
  7. Structural Functionalism – Emile Durkheim’s The Division of Labour in Society 
  8. Symbolic Interactionism – Herbert Blumer’s Symbolic Interactionism 
  9. Symbolic Interactionism – George Herbert Mead’s Mind, Self, and Society
  10. Symbolic Interactionism – An excerpt from Charles Cooley about the Looking Glass Self