SOC305 – Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination (pt. 1): “Can I call you ‘Mulan’?”

Abstract

Stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination– all words we use interchangeably, and consequently, words we sometimes use incorrectly! This week’s show is the first episode of a two-part series where we untangle these three concepts from each other, and get a better sense of when prejudice turns into discrimination. Tune in to learn more, and don’t forget to get us a rating when you’ve got a little time on your hands. Mahalo!

Keywords

Bias, discrimination, prejudice, racism, stereotypes

Sources

  1. We used Elliot Aronson’s fantastic book The Social Animal this episode.
  2. Some quick definitions from Aronson’s book:
    1. Stereotypes: “To assign identical characteristics to any person in a group, regardless of the actual variation among members of that group.” (pg. 244)
    2. Prejudice:  “A hostile or negative attitude toward a distinguishable group based on generalizations derived from faulty or incomplete information.”
    3. Discrimination: Unfair treatment of members of a stigmatized group that denies a member their rights.
  3. Headsets used to speak to other players in the online gaming world is a portal to hell (at least according to Ellen)! Read about it here in this Washington Post article, “Racism, Misogyny, and Death Threats: Why Can’t the Booming Video Game-Industry Curb Toxicity?”
  4. Ahhh, so Awkwafina was in the second Jumanji installment. That explains things…
  5. Ellen said, “Chinese Expulsion Act” but she should’ve said, “Chinese Exclusion Act.” Whoopsie! 
  6. Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds
  7. In case you were wondering, Bon Appetite Magazine is on the other side of the Goldfish vs. Cheez-Its debate!

SOC304 – PhD’s Guide to Money in Grad School

Abstract

If you hang around grad students, you’ll discover one of our favorite topics to discuss is money. We’re usually grumbling about funding, side gigs, constantly filling out applications for scholarships that we don’t get, and how we wiiiiiiish we had enough money to not have to live with roommates anymore. So in this PhD’s Guide, we’re gonna explore this topic by looking at the typical jobs available in grad school (including average stipend pay), what you should expect funding-wise from your department, and some academic job opportunities you can find to supplement your TA stipend. Tune in here to learn more about the precariousness of being a grad student!

Keywords

academia, budgets, funding, grad, graduate, masters, money, phd, school

Sources

  1. GA is a Graduate Assistant who may help administratively in a department (i.e. organize a small sized conference, bring in speakers, run the social media account of the department, etc.) and take on light researching duties.
  2. RA is a Research Assistant who works on a specified research project for either a professor or a research institute that is housed within the university system.
  3. TA is a Teaching Assistant who helps a professor or lecturer teach large undergraduate courses. Most duties include holding office hours for students, grading, proctoring exams, etc.
  4. We cited a CNN report from 2018, “How Graduate Students Pay for School”
  5. Interested in how a university with a unionized graduate student body works? Check out Rutgers! Collective bargaining for the win, y’all!
  6. Kanye is thinking about legally becoming, “Kanye Christian Genius Billionaire West”
  7. Washington Post article, “What we know about the mysterious vaping-linked illness and deaths,” in case you haven’t read the 100,000 news reports about it yet!
  8. Omar mentioned how our response to vaping deaths are driven in part by moral panics. What is a moral panic?

SOC303 – The “Myth” of Mental Illness

Abstract

Join the SB team as we talk about the “myth of mental illness,” a phrase coined by psychiatrist and medical sociologist, Thomas Szasz. Today we will be comparing the ideas of mental health and illness as “problems with living” to the medical model. As sociologists we are not anti-medicine or anti-doctor, but we do feel it necessary to use our perspective breakdown the essence of psychological functioning and the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as the gatekeeper.

Keywords

Mental illness, mental health, medical sociology, medicine, stigma, shame

Sources

  1. Thomas Szasz the Psychiatrist.
  2. The Myth of Mental Illness: 50 years later by Thomas Szasz 
  3. Szasz Under Fire: The Psychiatrist Abolitionist Faces His Critics
  4. According to the American Psychiatric Association, Mental Illness is..
  5. Sociology, on the other hand…
  6. Changing brain chemistry after trauma
  7. Overcoming the stigma of mental illness
  8. What is Neurodiversity? 
  9. What is Neurodiversity from an Autistic perspective (Video)
  10. Halloween and that “special candy”
  11. The Illusionist Magic Show
  12. SOC126: Medicalizing Behavior–Normal or “Abnormal”
  13. The Life Course Perspective. Classic and contemporary medical sociological theory 
  14. History of DSM and the most current edition–DSM 5
  15. Suicide Prevention Hotline

Breakaway Episode 7 – Monster Artists: When something you love is created by a monster

Abstract

It’s just Omar and Penn this week but we tackle an interesting dilemma that has come into the spotlight in the wake of the #MeToo movement – what are we supposed to do when we find out that the art we love was created by monster artists? From Johnny Depp to Michael Jackson to Louis CK, we discuss the various ways in which we can deal with this dilemma. As consumers, what is our responsibility to deal with these monster artists, and is that even the right question to ask? Read the Vox article we discuss before listening to the episode so you can follow along!

Keywords

artists, art, consumerism, consumption, #metoo, social movements, social justice

Sources

  1. The Vox article that we base our episode on – What do we do when the art we love was created by a monster? By Constance Grady (2018)



SOC302 – Podcasting w/ The Annex (Guest Edition)

Abstract

There are a few sociology podcasts out there and this week we’re lucky enough to have Dr. Joseph Cohen, host of one of our favorites, The Annex Sociology Podcast, on to talk shop! What inspired him to start The Annex? How has he incorporated podcasting into his research? And which episodes of The Annex should you check out? Tune in here to listen to our fun conversation and be sure to check out The Annex (and Joe’s other exciting shows) at www.sociocast.org.

Keywords

Sociology, podcasting, academic, annex, sociological

Sources

SOC301 – Intro to Sociology of Emotions: Did you cry at Avengers: Endgame?

Abstract

We’re back y’all!! And we’re starting off our third season with a deep dive into the field of the Sociology of Emotions, a relatively young but uber fascinating subfield. What exactly are emotions? How are some emotions more social than others? And why is it that Ellen cried twice watching Avengers: Endgame, while Penn was frustrated and Omar was just a little sad? Tune in to learn more! And remember to give us a rating and subscribe if you haven’t already.

Keywords

Emotions, feelings, microsociology, social psychology

Sources

  • Peggy Thoits is seen as one of the founding scholars of the Sociology of Emotions
    • She argues in her article, “The Sociology of Emotions” (1989) that emotions are comprised of 4 elements:
    • 1.     Appraisals of a situational stimulus or context
    • 2.     Changes in physiological or bodily sensations
    • 3.     The free or inhibited display of expressive gestures
    • 4.     A cultural label applied to specific constellations of one or more of the first three components
      •  ***All 4 components do not need to be present for an emotion to be expressed or recognized by others***
  • Arlie Hochschild (who we’ll be covering in the very near future) is also a huge scholar of emotions, so check her out.
  • Peter Burke and Jan Stets in Identity Theory (2009) define emotions as, “emotions generally refer to the feelings individuals experience in situations” (p. 155).
  • Avengers: Endgame trailer for all of you living under a rock who haven’t seen it (sry ‘bout the spoilers!)
  • Amazon rainforest is burning!
  • Alaska is burning!
  • Disneyland’s recent opening of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge is a) Phreaking phenomenal and b) Causing decreased attendance at the entire park

SOC216 – Feminist & Critical Criminology: Problematizing the State (Guest Edition)

Abstract

Feminism has a bad rep, but it’s an important social movement fighting for equality across sex, gender, race in our society. Right on the heels of Alabama and Georgia passing some of the most restrictive abortion laws that criminalize mothers and doctors who perform abortions, this week’s episode features a guest expert, Dr. Nicholas Chagnon, who helps us untangle the perspectives of critical feminism and feminist criminology. Learn how these perspectives analyze women’s reproductive rights, as well as how they approach criminology from a female-centered perspective.


Keywords

Feminism, criminology, critical criminology, feminist criminology, reproductive rights, the nation state

Sources

  • A few primer episodes to listen to:
  1. SOC107 – Who You Gonna Call? The Crimebusters!
  2. SOC204 – The Spectrum: An Introduction to Sex and Gender
  3. SOC205 – The Matrices of Oppression: An Introduction to Intersectionality
  4. SOC208 – Left Handed Devils: The Social Construction of Deviance
  5. SOC 214 – Reproductive Politics: The Body as a Site of Political Struggle


SOC215 – Social Stratification, Capitalism, and Inequality: All the Sad Things

Abstract

This week we’re introducing the alliterative and uber important concept of social stratification: how people are sorted into different hierarchical groups based on the intersections of class, race, gender, wealth, etc. Using the perspectives of Karl Marx and Max Weber, we discuss capitalism’s role in this hot unequal mess. Take a listen to the episode, as we break it down the current state of inequality in the world. And don’t forget to give us a rating and review after you listen! Mahalooooo!


Keywords

Social stratification, wealth, income, inequality, capitalism, Karl Marx, Max Weber

Sources


  1. What is social stratification? Social Stratification involves hierarchical differences associated with economic positions, social status and political power. How people are sorted into different groups based on class, race, gender, wealth, etc. Social stratification has a significant effect on how valuable resources (and by extension, class status and power) are allocated in society (adapted from Ritzer’s Introduction to Sociology)
  2. Karl Marx’s Das Kapital and the Communist Manifesto can be accessed for free here
  3. Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and Economy and Society excerpts here
  4. Guess how much money Jeff Bezos makes? Too much.
  5. Amazon employee Vickie Shannon Allen who hurt her back while working in an Amazon factory that did not meet safety standards.
  6. Zuckerberg San Francisco General hospital overcharging their patients for care and medicine
  7. Of course, Ellen brought up Rachel Dolezal again… Wonder what she’s up to?
  8. Free online copy of The Great Gatsby. If you haven’t read it before, you should go back to your 6th grade teacher and ask him/her what in the heck they were teaching that year that they didn’t make you read The Great Gatsby.
  9. After the recent HBO documentary, “Leaving Neverland” about Michael Jackson, The Simpsons pulled an episode featuring the pop star
  10. Stem cell treatment curing HIV/AIDS in the UK– Hooray!

Breakaway 6 – “JPOP, KPOP, and Boy Bands”: A Rant by Dr. Penn

Abstract

We do a quick breakaway this week on a fun topic – boybands! Why is J-Pop and K-Pop so globally popular? What’s the difference between American, Japanese, and Korean boybands anyway? K-Pop is known for their perfectly choreographed and intricate dancing with pitch perfect singing; while J-Pop aims to be your boyband next door. But you might be surprised to learn that they arose out of very different sociopolitical contexts! Each genre has quite an interesting history in relation to trade, economy, and globalization. We discuss the idea of soft power, and how various industries use their cultural products to become a cultural force around the world.
Keywords
Boybands, consumption, popular culture, JPop, Kpop

Sources
  1. BTS – one of the currently most popular K-Pop group
  2. K-Pop Group BTS Wins 2019 TIME 100 Reader Poll
  3. BTS’ UN speech in 2018
  4. BTS’ DNA – their most watched music video as of April 2019
  5. Soft Power” article by Joseph Nye (for the book, see here)
  6. SMAP – one of Japan’s most famous boybands
  7. SMAP’s “Sekai ni hitotsu dake no hana” – one of their most famous songs

SOC 214 – Reproductive Politics: The Body as a Site of Political Struggle

Abstract:

In this episode, the team tackles one of the most sensitive topics within current social discussions – reproductive politics. Using Rickie Solinger’s seminal book Reproductive Politics, we discuss how the women’s bodies have become a site of public political struggle, thereby, determining the level of personal autonomy and privacy available to women. We highlight an aspect of Solinger’s work on fetal personhood, and how the rights of the fetus have been constructed, in some ways, in conflict with the mother’s rights.

*NOTE: This episode was recorded last year in 2018 (hence, the breakdowns are old), but we did not want to release it until we had covered the umbrella topics around reproductive politics. For a primer on episodes to listen to before this episode, check out the following:

  1. SOC109 – Illness & Morality: A Look at Medical Sociology
  2. SOC126-Medicalizing Behavior: Common or “Abnormal”?
  3. SOC204 – The Spectrum: An Introduction to Sex and Gender
  4. SOC205 – The Matrices of Oppression: An Introduction to Intersectionality
  5. SOC 213 – Doulas and Midwives and Women’s Health, Oh My!
Keywords:

Reproductive politics, fetal personhood, autonomy, sex, gender

Sources:

  1. Reproductive Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know by Rickie Solinger (2013)
  2. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity by Judith Butler (2015)
  3. The Status Syndrome: How Social Standing Affects Our Health and Longevity by Michael Marmot (2005)
  4. Breastfeeding in public is finally legal in all 50 US states
  5. Roe v. Wade: The Constitutional Right to Access Safe, Legal Abortion
  6. Does the GOP tax bill introduce anti-abortion ‘fetal personhood’ legislation?
  7. Abortion after the first trimester
  8. Induced Abortion in the United States
  9. Trump just basically said he’s anti-childbirth
  10. The Criminalization of Bad Mothers (New York Times)
  11. State Laws on Fetal Homicide and Penalty-Enhancement for Crimes Against Pregnant Women
  12. Unborn Victims of Violence Act
  13. Woman whose rapist was granted joint custody of child speaks out
  14. How can US rapist win joint custody of victim’s child?
  15. Ronald Reagan, The Silent Scream and the Slow Rise of Fetal Pain
  16. Abortion in the US: Five Key Facts
  17. Characteristics of U.S. Abortion Patients in 2014 and Changes Since 2008
  18. Waiting Periods and the Rising Price of Abortion